To Ambrose E. Burnside

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
War Department,                                Washington, D.C.,
Major General Burnside                    Sep. 25. 1863

Yours of the 23rd. is just received, and it makes me doubt whether I am awake or dreaming. I have been struggling for ten days, first through Gen. Halleck, and then directly, to get you to go to assist Gen. Rosecrans in an extremity, and you have repeatedly declared you would do it, and yet you steadily move the contrary way. On the 19th. you telegraph once from Knoxville, and twice from Greenville, acknowledging receipt of order, and saying you will hurry support to Rosecrans. On the 20th. you telegraph again from Knoxville, saying you will do all you can, and are hurrying troops to Rosecrans. On the 21st. you telegraph from Morristown, saying you will hurry support to Rosecrans; and now your despatch of the 23rd. comes in from Carter’s Station, still farther away from Rosecrans, still saying you will assist him, but giving no account of any progress made towards assisting him

You came in upon the Tennessee River at Kingston, Loudon, and Knoxville; and what bridges or the want of them upon the Holston, can have to do in getting the troops towards Rosecrans at Chattanooga is incomprehensible. They were already many miles nearer Chattanooga than any part of the Holston river is, and on the right side of it. If they are now on the wrong side of it, they can only have got so by going from the direction of Chattanooga, and that too, since you have assured us you would move to Chattanooga; while it would seem too, that they could re-cross the Holston, by whatever means they crossed it going East

Lincoln endorsed the back of the second page “Not sent.”

Advertisements

To Ambrose E. Burnside

“Cypher”
Gen. Burnside                        Washington City,
Knoxville, Tenn                      Sep. 21. 2.AM 1863

Go to Rosecrans with your force, without a moment delay.

A. LINCOLN

To Ambrose E. Burnside

Cypher
Major General Burnside                         Washington, D.C.
Cumberland Gap:                                     Sep. 11. 1863

Yours received. A thousand thanks for the late sucesses you have given us.

We can not allow you to resign until things shall be a little more settled in East-Tennessee. If then, purely on your own account, you wish to resign, we will not further refuse you

A. LINCOLN

To Ambrose E. Burnside

Major General Burnside                Washington, D.C.,
Cincinnati, O                                    July 27 1863

Let me explain. In Gen. Grant’s first despatch after the fall of Vicksburg, he said, among other things, he would send the Ninth Corps to you. Thinking it would be pleasant to you, I asked the Secretary of War to telegraph you the news. For some reason, never mentioned to us by Gen. Grant, they have not been sent, though we have seen out-side intimations that they took part in the expedition against Jackson. Gen. Grant is a copious worker, and fighter, but a very meagre writer, or telegrapher. No doubt he changed his purpose in regard to the Ninth Corps, for some sufficient reason, but has forgotten to notify us of it.

A. LINCOLN

To Ambrose E. Burnside

“Cypher”
Major General Burnside— Washington, D.C.
Cincinnati, O. May 29. 1863

Your despatch of to-day received. When I shall wish to supersede you I will let you know. All the cabinet regretted the necessity of arresting, for instance, Vallandigham, some perhaps, doubting, that there was a real necessity for it—but, being done, all were for seeing you through with it. A. LINCOLN

To Ambrose E. Burnside

Major Genl. Burnside Washington, D.C.,
Falmouth, Va. Aug. 29. 2/30 P.MX 1862.

Any further news? Does Col. Devin mean that sound of firing was heard in direction of Warrenton, as stated, or in direction of Warrenton Junction? A. LINCOLN

To Ambrose E. Burnside

Major Genl. Burnside
Falmouth, Va Aug. 28. 2/40 P.M. 1862

Any news from Gen. Pope? A. LINCOLN